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Sierra de Tejeda & Almijara

Tejeda

Their foothills lapped by the water of Maro Cliffs, the Sierra de Tejeda y Almijara stand solemn and proud. This 40,663 hectare natural park serves as a natural barrier between the provinces of Malaga and Granada. Its guardian is Maroma Peak, whose 2,068 metres provide unparalleled views of the Mediterranean. As for the origin of the names of these two mountain ranges, Almijara was an allusion by the Arabs to the speed with which rainfall formed a stream that flowed into the sea: “draining board” is the approximate translation of the Arabic “almijara”: however, there is another school of thought that points instead to the heavy presence of what were known in Arabic times as “almijares”, structures common in country houses which are used to dry out raisins, a fruit abundant in the area.

The name Tejeda, on the other hand, appeared as a result of the numerous yew trees or tejos that once grew in the area. This highly-unusual example of local flora still survives today in the shape of a small forest, the southernmost in the province and one of the most significant of its kind in Andalusia.

Almijara

If the list of endemic floral riches is almost endless, then the same could be said of the local fauna, the highlight of which is the mountain goat. The area, which was declared a National Hunting Reserve many years ago, has become home to one of the largest colonies of this virtually-extinct mammal to be found not only in the province but in the whole Spain. In just twenty five years, its number has risen to over 1,000.

Of less significance, though equally charming, are the common squirrel, the snake eagle, the nightjar and the peregrine falcon, all of which breathe life into a region dominate by the rocky relief of its miountains.



Malaga Natural Parks Information

  • El Chorro
  • El Torcal
  • Guadalhorce Valley
  • Fuente de Piedra Lagoons
  • Maro Cliffs
  • Sierra de las nieves
  • Sierra de Tejera y Almijara
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